end of Obamacare
MIAMI, FL - DECEMBER 15: An Obamacare sign is seen on the UniVista Insurance company office on December 15, 2015 in Miami, Florida. Today, is the deadline to sign up for a plan under the Affordable Care Act for people that want to be insured on January 1, 2016. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

In 2017, the possible end of Obamacare will be a major news story to follow. With attacks on two fronts, the Obama administration could see one of their most notable policies disappear. Or be changed in a way where it is no longer recognizable.

In this audio report, we analyze the problems that may spell doom for Obamacare in the new year. While the system has been beneficial to millions of Americans, its inherent flaws have dogged it since its inception.

 

Here is a transcription of the first few minutes of the report, to entice you for more:

With the 2016 presidential elections in the books, focus will turn to another divisive topic for many Americans—The Affordable Care Act—a.k.a. “Obamacare”. Once the transition to a Republican executive branch is complete in 2017, this healthcare bill may be transitioned out of its current role, just like its namesake.

Since the bill was enacted in 2014, tens of millions of Americans have had the saving grace of receiving affordable health care. However, there ability to retain their much needed health insurance could be endangered from two sources.

One opponent will be a Republican controlled government, and its newly elected president–Donald J. Trump. The party has never been in favor of the Obama regimes health care reform.

The other challenge will come from an extreme rise in monthly premiums, that are expected to start next year. The combined problems could spell dark days ahead for “Obamacare.”

From the start, the Affordable Care Act has had its detractors in the Republican party. The law has been challenged by congress as they have tried to repeal it on several occasions. There has long been a stalemate between the President and congress over the act. But with President Obama as its biggest supporter, it has endured, and for good reason. President Obama explained why in a 2014 speech after the launch of the act.

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