SALT LAKE CITY - MARCH 21: Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders gives a fist pump after his speech at West High School at a campaign rally on March 21, 2016 in Salt Lake City, Utah. The Republican and Democratic caucuses are March 22. (Photo by George Frey/Getty Images)

We were told the Democratic nominee was going be Hillary Clinton. Hell, it almost certainly will be as whispers that Bernie Sanders has all but accepted defeat have been making waves over the weekend. Despite this, the #FeelTheBern phenomenon has gripped many would-be and potential voters across the United States, none more so than the young electorate who were supposed to the be ones who might not have sympathised with the “more mature” Sanders.

But if Bernie Sanders can’t raise enough support in the eleventh hour, as it seems extremely unlikely after Hillary Clinton declared victory on Tuesday, would it have all been pointless?

The all-too familiar speeches have rung true time and time again:

“I have been all over this country in this campaign, and what I have seen is not what should be going on in America. How come we can have trillions to fight a war in Iraq, but not have the money to re-build inner cities in America? If elected, we’re not going to rebuild communities in Afghanistan, we’re going to re-build communities in the United States.”

If we can credit Sanders for one thing is it’s his unapologetic and steadfast approach that has impacted so many young people—a group who have been far too inactive for far too long. His message is one they wanted—no, needed—to hear. The youth unemployment rate is twice the current national average, and for those fortunate enough to have gone to post-secondary schools, their debts are proving almost insurmountable. The pro-Sanders rallies have been largely organized and attended by young people who recognize that they are severely mistreated.

Whether the impact will be a lasting one is yet to be determined of course, but how refreshing is it to see people give a damn?

Change is happening though, even before the outcome is determined, as a result of Sanders’ supporters. Recently, Politico writer Kristen East wrote on Tulsi Gubbard, Democratic Party member from Hawai’i, and her attempt to drum support to end the party’s superdelegate process.

Change is happening. And change is good.

But perhaps his greatest achievement despite the loss is that he will have upped Clinton’s—and indeed the entire party’s game. The Democratic Party never knew what hit them when the Vermont senator slowly climbed the polls.

Perhaps his rallying cry won’t be short lived, and his loss (if it indeed takes place) won’t have been pointless.

A note from producer Brian Lis:
“To the Bernie volunteers who tirelessly devote their time and energy to the campaign, you are unsung heroes. You are the fuel that keeps the fire Berning strong, and an inspiration to future generations.”

I just hope those future generations remain as steadfast as the man they have been following for all these months.

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